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MIT CENTER FOR DIGITAL BUSINESS FELLOWS
ARAL, SINAN
DAVENPORT, THOMAS
DAVIDSON, ALAN
KAHIN, BRIAN
GANS, JOSHUA
GREENSTEIN, SHANE
LOOFBOURROW, TOD
MCELHERAN, KRISTINA STEFFENSON
PARKER, GEOFFREY
SCHRAGE, MICHAEL
VAN ALSTYNE, MARSHALL
WLADAWSKY-BERGER, IRVING
WU, LYNN




SINAN ARAL
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF INFORMATION, OPERATIONS & MANAGEMENT, NEW YORK UNIVERSITY

Sinan Aral is an Assistant Professor of Information, Operations and Management Sciences. He received his Ph.D. from the MIT Sloan School of Management. Prior to MIT, he was a Fulbright Scholar and worked at the European Commission in Brussels and as a technology consultant for several Fortune 500 firms.

Professor Aral's research focuses on social contagion and measuring and managing how information diffusion in massive social networks affects information worker productivity, consumer demand and viral marketing. He also studies the role of information and information technology in the productivity and performance of firms. Sinan's research has won numerous awards including the Microsoft Faculty Fellowship (2010), the PopTech Science Fellowship (2010), an NSF Early Career Development (CAREER) Award (2009), four best paper awards at the International Conference on Information Systems, the ACM SIGMIS Best Dissertation Award (2007) and the IBM Faculty Award (2009). His work has been published or is forthcoming in leading journals such as the American Journal of Sociology, Management Science, Marketing Science, the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), Science, Organization Science, the Harvard Business Review and the Sloan Management Review, and has been mentioned in popular press outlets such as The Economist, The New York Times, Businessweek, Wired and CIO Magazine. He is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Northwestern University (B.A.) and holds an M.Sc. from the London School of Economics and an M.P.P. from Harvard University.

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THOMAS H. DAVENPORT
PRESIDENT'S CHAIR / DISTINGUISHED PROFESSOR IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT, BABSON COLLEGE / SENIOR ADVISOR TO DELOITTE ANALYTICS

Thomas H. Davenport is an American academic and author specializing in business process innovation and knowledge management. He is currently the President’s Distinguished Professor in Information Technology and Management at Babson College and Director of Research for Babson Executive Education and leads sponsored research programs on analytics, knowledge management, process management, and innovation.

Davenport has written, co-authored, or edited eleven other books, including the first books on business process re-engineering and achieving value from enterprise systems, and the best seller, Working Knowledge (with Larry Prusak) (Davenport & Prusak 2000), on knowledge management. He has written more than one hundred articles for such publications as Harvard Business Review, MIT Sloan Management Review, California Management Review, the Financial Times, and many other publications. Davenport has also been a columnist for CIO, InformationWeek, and Darwin magazines.

In 2003, Davenport was named one of the world’s 'Top 25 Consultants' by Consulting magazine, and in 2005 was named one of the world’s top three analysts of business and technology by readers of Optimize magazine.

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ALAN DAVIDSON
VISITING SCHOLAR, MIT SLOAN SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT, MIT COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LABORATORY (CSAIL)


Alan B. Davidson is currently a Visiting Scholar at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, based in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) and the Sloan School of Management. Until February 2012 he was the Director of Public Policy for Google in the Americas. Alan opened Google's Washington, D.C. office in 2005, and led the company’s public policy and government relations efforts in North and South America. Prior to joining Google, Alan was Associate Director of the Center for Democracy and Technology, a public interest group promoting civil liberties and human rights online. He has testified before Congress, written, and spoken widely on a range of Internet policy issues incuding privacy, content regulation, cloud computing, encryption, network neutrality and copyright online.

Alan started professional life as a computer scientist. He was as a senior consultant at Booz Allen & Hamilton, where he helped design information systems for NASA's Space Station Freedom Project. Alan has a bachelor’s degree in mathematics and computer science and a master’s degree in technology and policy from MIT. He is also a graduate of the Yale Law School, where he was Symposium Editor of the Yale Law Journal.



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JOSHUA GANS
PROFESSOR OF STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT, ROTMAN SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT, UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO

Joshua Gans is a Professor of Strategic Management and holder of the Jeffrey S. Skoll Chair of Technical Innovation and Entrepreneurship at the Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto (with a cross appointment in the Department of Economics). Prior to 2011, he was the foundation Professor of Management (Information Economics) at the Melbourne Business School, University of Melbourne and prior to that he was at the School of Economics, University of New South Wales. In 2011, Joshua was a visiting researcher at Microsoft Research (New England). Joshua holds a Ph.D. from Stanford University and an honors degree in economics from the University of Queensland. In 2012, Joshua was appointed as a Research Associate of the NBER in the Productivity, Innovation and Entrepreneurship Program.

At Rotman, he teaches MBA and Commerce students Network and Digital Market Strategy. He has also co-authored (with Stephen King and Robin Stonecash) the Australasian edition of Greg Mankiw's Principles of Economics (published by Cengage), Core Economics for Managers (Cengage), Finishing the Job (MUP) and Parentonomics (New South/MIT Press).

While Joshua's research interests are varied he has developed specialities in the nature of technological competition and innovation, economic growth, publishing economics, industrial organisation and regulatory economics. This has culminated in publications in the American Economic Review, Journal of Political Economy, RAND Journal of Economics, Journal of Economic Perspectives, Journal of Public Economics, and the Journal of Regulatory Economics. Joshua serves as an associate editor of Management Science and the Journal of Industrial Economics and is on the editorial boards of the BE Journals of Economic Analysis and Policy, Economic Analysis and Policy, Games and the Review of Network Economics. In 2007, Joshua was awarded the Economic Society of Australia’s Young Economist Award. In 2008, Joshua was elected as a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, Australia. Details of his research activities can be found here.

On the consulting side, Joshua is managing director of CoRE Research. In the past, Joshua has worked with several established consulting firms including London Economics, Frontier Economics and Charles River Associates. He has also been retained by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission and the Federal Trade Commission where he worked on expert testimony in several abuse of market power cases as well as on issues in telecommunications network competition. Overall his consulting experience covers energy (gas and electricity markets), telecommunications, financial services and banking, pharmaceuticals and rail transport.

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SHANE GREENSTEIN
KELLOGG CHAIR OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND PROFESSOR OF MANAGEMENT AND STRATEGY AT THE KELLOGG SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT, NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY

Shane Greenstein is Professor in the Management and Strategy Department at the Kellogg School of Management, and, by courtesy, in the School of Communications, Northwestern University. He is the Kellogg Chair of Information Technology. He is a leading researcher in the business economics of computing, communications and Internet infrastructure. Many of these essays and other commentary are on his blog called virulent word of mouse and digitopoly. He is presently writing a history of the development of the commercial Internet in the United States.

Greenstein is co-director of the economics of digitization at the National Bureau of Economic Research, and editor of the business/economics section of the Communications of the ACM. He was administrative head of his department from 2002 to 2005. Greenstein received his BA from University of California at Berkeley in 1983, and his PhD from Stanford University in 1989, both in economics. He also continues to receive a daily education in life from his wife and children

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BRIAN KAHIN
SENIOR FELLOW, THE COMPUTER & COMMUNICATIONS INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION / FELLOW, MIT CENTER FOR DIGITAL BUSINESS


Brian Kahin is a Fellow at the MIT Sloan School Center for Digital Business and Senior Fellow at the Computer & Communications Industry Association. He was recently Innovation Policy Fellow in the Directorate for Science, Technology and Industry at the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) in Paris. Brian was founding director of the Harvard Information Infrastructure Project (1989-1997), the first university-based program to address the social, economic, and policy implications of the Internet. He subsequently served three years as Senior Policy Analyst at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, where he chaired the Interagency Working Group on the Digital Economy on behalf of the National Economic Council. He has taught at Harvard, the University of Maryland, the University of Michigan, and the University of Colorado. Brian has edited ten books on digital economy issues including Understanding the Digital Economy (with Erik Brynjolfsson) and, most recently, Advancing Knowledge and the Knowledge Economy (with Dominique Foray).


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>>Curriculum vitae



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TOD LOOFBOURROW
CO-FOUNDER AND PRESIDENT OF iROBOTC

Tod Loofbourrow, a technology executive and entrepreneur, is cofounder and president of iRobot Healthcare, a business unit of iRobot Corporation (NASDAQ: IRBT). The company is devoted to developing health care applications that achieve the mission of “adding a million years of independent living to our customers and their families.”

Mr. Loofbourrow most recently founded and served as chairman and CEO of Authoria, a $38 million software-as-a-service leader in the health/benefits information and talent management space, serving over 4 million users and delivering over a billion page views a year to customers. Authoria helped define the talent management space with Gartner and emerged as a top player in the field, leading to its sale in 2008.

Mr. Loofbourrow has been actively involved in the health space for 20 years. He recently collaborated with David Cutler, David Blumenthal, Erik Brynjolfsson, and others in developing a $19 billion part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 associated with providing doctors and hospitals with incentives to deploy and meaningfully use electronic medical records to better collaborate across the medical system, and to better aggregate data on what works and what doesn’t for improving patients’ outcomes.

Previously, Mr. Loofbourrow was founder, managing director, and CEO of Foundation Technologies, Inc., a strategic consulting firm specializing in content, rule, and knowledge-based systems for Fortune 2000 CIOs. Notable customer successes include the first-ever Managed Second Surgical Opinion system for managed care, built for Aetna and Medical Intelligence—and later sold to McKesson.

Mr. Loofbourrow was educated at Harvard and Oxford universities. He taught graduate courses on Internet commerce and artificial intelligence at Harvard University for seven years and has lectured at Stanford, the MIT Sloan School of Management, Harvard Business School, Babson College, and others. He is the author or chapter contributor to six books, the first of which was a 20,000-copy trade bestseller on computer science and robotics, written at the age of 16.



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KRISTINA STEFFENSON MCELHERAN
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION IN TECHNOLOGY AND OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT, HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL.

Kristina Steffenson McElheran is the Lumry Family Assistant Professor of Business Administration in Technology and Operations Management at the Harvard Business School. Kristina conducts empirical economics-based research on the interactions between information technology, firm performance, and competitive strategy. Her focus is on understanding the drivers and implications of how firms use information technology to collaborate and compete in the marketplace.

Prior to her academic career, Kristina worked for two start-up technology companies in Silicon Valley. The first, Risk Management Solutions, has become a leading provider of products and services for managing risks associated with natural disasters. The second, Exemplary Software, provided collaborative web-based supply chain management solutions.

Kristina’s PhD (2009) in Managerial Economics and Strategy comes from Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management. She also holds a Diploma in Economics (1999) from the London School of Economics, as well as a Master's degree (1994) in International Development Policy and a Bachelor's degree (1993) in Political Science from Stanford University.

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GEOFFREY PARKER
PROFESSOR OF MANAGEMENT SCIENCE AT A.B. FREEMAN SCHOOL OF BUSINESS, TULANE UNIVERSITY

Dr. Parker is Professor of Management Science at the A. B. Freeman School of Business at Tulane University. Parker teaches energy risk management, information systems, and operations management courses in the undergraduate, full-time MBA, professional MBA, and executive MBA programs.

Parker also serves as Director of the Tulane Energy Institute. The Institute is chartered to establish a systematic research program aimed at improving the understanding of the integration of energy markets, policy, technology, and the environment. The Institute is also the coordinating unit for the Masters of Management - Energy Finance and Trading. Externally, Parker is serving or has served as a panelist for the National Science Foundation, a Senior Editor for the journal Production and Operations Management, and associate editor for the journal Management Science.

Parker's research explores the economics of platform design and pricing. Recent work includes a cross-industry study of outsourced engineering projects, a study of pricing information products in two-sided markets with network externalities (two-sided networks), models of growth and innovation in platform markets, and an analysis of the performance of markets for electricity financial transmission rights.

Dr. Parker received a B.S. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from Princeton University, a M.S. in Electrical Engineering in the Technology and Policy Program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and a Ph.D. in Management Science from the MIT Sloan School of Management.

Prior to graduate school, Parker completed the General Electric Company Financial Management Training Program and held jobs at GE as an electrical engineer, financial analyst, and business development analyst.

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 >> Geoff's webpage



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MICHAEL SCHRAGE
RESEARCH FELLOW, MIT SLOAN SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT / EXECUTIVE EDUCATION FACULTY

Michael Schrage is one of the world’s most innovative thought leaders on innovation.

He has redefined how we think about innovation by focusing on customer acceptance of new products and services as an integral part of the innovation process.

He also has pioneered techniques for using rapid prototyping, simulations and modeling to improve return on innovation investment. Michael is the author of two critically acclaimed books: Serious Play: How the World’s Best Companies Simulate to Innovate and Shared Minds—The New Technologies of Collaboration.

A research fellow at the MIT Sloan School’s Center for Digital Business, Michael is a columnist for Fortune, CIO Magazine and MIT’s Technology Review, and is widely published in the business press. He is a regular contributor to The Conference Board Review.

Michael is a senior advisor to MIT’s Security Studies Program and consults to the U.S. government on national security systems innovation. Michael is a powerful speaker with a very direct and engaging style. His work redefines not just how innovation is done but what innovation means. Innovation is not what innovators do; it’s not about good new ideas. Innovation is about good new ideas that customers will pay a premium to adopt and use! Innovation & marketing. The most innovative organizations fuse "marketing" and "innovation" into an integrated strategy for growth. This redefines how you innovate and how you market your innovations. The key is to understand how your inventions will affect customer relationships and develop strategies that help customers embrace your innovations. Michael Schrage knows how to make such integrative strategies work.

Perhaps no one knows more about how to maximize return on investment from innovation processes than Michael Schrage. The key, as he describes in his groundbreaking book, Serious Play—How the World’s Best Companies Simulate to Innovate, is rapid experimentation and prototyping, speedy simulation and digital design. New prototyping methods have radically reduced the cost of testing products, services and business models, effectively creating a new financial resource—iterative capital, a resource that allows you to play seriously with more and more versions of various ideas in less and less time. Michael helps businesses master these techniques and spend their iterative capital wisely. Manage the links between innovation, the supply chain and the customer cost-effectively.

Michael’s critically acclaimed first book, Shared Minds: The New Technologies of Collaboration, is the first book to explore the tools and dynamics of successful collaboration as the behavioral key to successful innovation.

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MARSHALL VAN ALSTYNE
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, BOSTON UNIVERSITY

Professor Van Alstyne received a BA from Yale, and MS & PhD degrees from MIT. He is an Associate Professor at Boston University and a Visiting Professor at MIT.

His work concerns information economics. In designing information goods, this research concerns competitive strategy and network effects. In control over information, it concerns who has access to what information, when, and at what price. Work also balances open source principles against those that generate profits and stimulate innovation.

Professor Van Alstyne was among the first to document productivity effects of IT and communications at the individual desktop level. His work has received an NSF Career Award, two best paper awards, and has appeared in Science, Management Science, Harvard Business Review, and the popular press.

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IRVING WLADAWSKY-BERGER
VISITING LECTURER, MIT SLOAN SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT

I retired from IBM on May 31, 2007 after 37 years with the company. Since then, I have continued to consult for IBM in a number of initiatives including Cloud Computing, Smart Planet and other technical and innovation areas. In March of 2008 I joined Citigroup as Strategic Advisor, helping with innovation and technology initiatives across the company.

At IBM I was responsible for identifying emerging technologies and marketplace developments that are critical to the future of the IT industry, and then organizing activities in and outside IBM in order to capitalize on them. I was also responsible for our university relations office and for the IBM Academy of Technology where I served as Chairman of the Board of Governors. In 1996, I led the effort to formulate IBM’s Internet strategy and to develop and bring to market leading-edge Internet technologies that could be integrated into IBM’s mainstream business. Since then, I have led a number of company wide initiatives like Linux, Grid Computing and, in October 2002, our On Demand Business initiative.

I am Visiting Lecturer at MIT's Sloan School of Management and Engineering Systems Division; Senior Fellow at the Levin Institute of the State University of New York; and Adjunct Professor in the Innovation and Entrepreneurship Group at the Imperial College Business School. In my academic activities I am involved in multi-disciplinary research and teaching focused on how technology can best help transform business organizations and the institutions of society

I am a member of BP’s Technology Advisory Council, the Visiting Committee for the Physical Sciences Division at the University of Chicago and the Board of Visitors for the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences at the University of Texas at Austin. It was my honor to serve on and later act as co-chair of the President’s Information Technology Advisory Committee from 1997 to 2001, and to be a founding member of the Computer Sciences and Telecommunications Board of the National Research Council in 1986. I am a former member of University of Chicago Board of Governors for Argonne National Laboratories and of the Board of Overseers for Fermilab. A few years ago, I was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Having been born in Cuba and come to the US at the age of 15, one of the things of which I am proudest is having been named 2001 Hispanic Engineer of the Year. I have an M.S. and Ph. D. in physics from the University of Chicago."

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WU, LYNN
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

Lynn Wu is an assistant professor at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania. She is interested in studying how information and information technology impact the productivity of information workers, organization and broad sectors of economy. Specifically, her work follows three streams. In the first stream, she studies how social networks and information derived from social networks affect individuals’ performance and long-term career trajectories. In her second stream of research, she examines the role of investment in IT and complementary organizational practices to explain how firms can achieve greater business value from IT. In her third stream, Lynn leverages fine-grained nanodata available through online digital traces to predict economic indicators such as real estate trends, labor trends and product adoption.

Lynn has published articles in economics, management and computer science. Her work has been featured by the Wall Street Journal, BusinessWeek, and The Economist

Lynn received her undergraduate degrees from MIT (Finance and Computer Science), her master’s degree from MIT (Computer Science) and her Ph.D. from MIT Sloan School of Management (Management Science)

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